Leading People to Christ (Groundwork Everyday Book 8)

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One right thought can correct a lot of bad behavior. As human beings, we latch on to certain ideas and assumptions and they blind us from seeing other options and responses to what life throws at us. We get ideas in our head that can literally block us from seeing other perspectives. We have to unlearn some behaviors and then learn and put into practice the new thinking and resulting behaviors.

And it just takes time. We have to wake up every day and know that we have a tendency—not just because of our life experiences, but also because of the way that we have chosen to respond to them—to repeat a certain set of behaviors over and over again. And learn from it. And then go to work on the thinking behind the behaviors we want to change.

STOP To start, you must stop. CUT Eliminate : Every yes contains a no. Do You Need an Attitude Adjustment? To some, this comes naturally. Others must constantly work on it. Since my earliest memory, I have had the sense that anything worth doing… worth pursuing… must be passionately pursued.

A positive attitude naturally follows. I found myself first assuming leadership responsibilities at age 14 when I became an Eagle Scout. For me, getting there was just a mountain to climb. It was the culmination of 21 merit badges and a large community project. It was the excitement of the journey, the arrival at a destination, and the achievement of the reward. For me, at 14 years old, it was like reaching the top of Mount Everest but with no real thought or plan on how I was going to get back down… the part of the climb where most people die.

But it did help jump-start a lifelong journey to develop and sharpen my leadership skills—a journey that really never ends. Great leaders constantly deal with the struggle between achieving personal goals, while doing so with humility. In high school, I held leadership roles in school government and on the sports field.

My agreement sealed my fate. All these experiences helped shape my thinking about, and commitment to, leadership because people started to turn to me to lead. I had the right attitude throughout these early years. However, there came a period in college when I lost my way. My attendance at Purdue was facilitated by an Army ROTC scholarship, at a time when the Vietnam War was stoking nationwide protests across nearly every college campus.

Compared to other campuses, Purdue was a fairly conservative school, but we had a chapter of the Students for Democratic Society SDS , and they regularly protested the war on the mall or at the Armory. I had mixed feelings about the war when I arrived at Purdue in , having spent most of my high school years in Europe—insulated from the anti-war movement. But since I had an ROTC scholarship and my dad was retiring from the Air Force and starting law school about the same time I entered college, I felt an obligation to stay in a program that was paying my way.

I also worked 4 hours each evening Monday - Friday as a janitor, cleaning the second floor of the university library to help make ends meet. Then an unfortunate event happened. Just walking across campus in uniform to attend military drills drew unwanted attention. So, when the annual Army ROTC awards ceremony occurred in the spring of my freshman year , and knowing that I was not an award recipient, I decided to skip the ceremony and attend the SDS rally in the mall instead.

I followed the crowd. Upon arriving at the armory, they broke open the large truck-sized doors and entered, chanting loud and strong. State troopers in riot gear soon arrived to keep the protesters away from the formation of cadets. He called me in the following morning and told me that my scholarship was being put on probation. This was a wakeup call for me, and it began the reshaping of my attitude. I had to decide which side to be on. I came to realize that I wanted to be a leader more than a protestor.

Like some other Americans, I may have thought that the Vietnam War was ill-advised, but I also realized that there were alternative ways to make my mark on the world. When ROTC summer camp training rolled around between my junior and senior year, I spent nine weeks at Fort Riley and did well enough to become the third ranking cadet at Purdue during my senior year.

Upon graduation from Purdue in , I was one of six cadets designated a Distinguished Military Graduate. So, what should you take from this ROTC experience? In a nutshell: attitude counts. A lot. You need building blocks to realize that dream. During those early years at Purdue—at least as it applied to an Army career—I lacked ambition, a good self-awareness, and perseverance.

I then adjusted my attitude, and a 4-year commitment turned into a year career. Consider, for example, all the other concepts that courage connects to in workplace settings. Innovation takes courage because it requires creating ideas that are ground-breaking and tradition-defying; great ideas always start out as blasphemy!

And sales always take courage because it requires knocking on the doors of prospects over and over in the face of rejection. Having a way of categorizing courageous behavior allows you to pinpoint the exact type of courage that each individual worker may be most in need of building. TRY Courage is the courage of action. It is the courage of initiative. TRY Courage requires you to exert energy in order to overcome inertia. You experience your TRY Courage whenever you must attempt something for the very first time, as when you cross over a threshold that other people may have already crossed over.

First attempts; for example, the first time you lead an important strategic initiative for the company. Pioneering efforts, such as leading an initiative that your organization has never done before. Taking action. All courage buckets come with a risk, and the risk is what causes people to avoid behaving with courage. The risk associated with TRY Courage is that your courageous actions may harm you, and, perhaps more importantly, other people. If you act on the risk and wipe out, not only are you likely to be hurt, but you could also potentially harm those around you. It is the risk of harming yourself or others that most commonly causes people to avoid exercising their TRY Courage.

TRUST Courage is very hard for people who tend to be controlling and those who have been burned by trusting people in the past. Following the lead of others, such as letting a direct report facilitate your meeting. Presuming positive intentions and giving team members the benefit of the doubt. By trusting others, you open yourself up to the possibility of your trust being misused. Thus, many people, especially those who have been betrayed in the past, find offering people trust very difficult. For them, entrusting others is an act of courage.

TELL Courage is what is needed to tell the truth, regardless of how difficult that truth may be for others to hear. It is the courage to not bite your tongue when you feel strongly about something. TELL Courage requires independence of thought. The courage of TELL is associated with: Speaking up and asserting yourself when you feel strongly about an issue.

Using constructive confrontation, such as providing difficult feedback to a peer, direct report, or boss. Courage is Contagious Understanding and influencing courageous behavior requires that you be well versed in the different ways that people behave when their courage is activated. By acting in a way that demonstrates these different types of courage, and by fostering an environment that encourages them, you can make your company culture a courageous one where employees innovate and grow both personally and professionally.

The only questions are what and how much. Poor choices lead you into failure, and good choices take you out of failure. Nobody likes failure. We are lead to believe that failure means that there is something wrong with us. Failure simply represents a challenge; not something to avoid. We crave certainty, and that feeds our fears. But your purpose will compel you to keep going, adapt, and grow.

Rowling, David Neeleman, and other well-known and not so well-known individuals, but he includes his own experiences that give it depth and credibility. Fail More will help you to work past your fears, the obstacles, set realistic goals, and learn from every result. Success is a process, and failure is part of that process.

Failure gives you the critical feedback you need to make the necessary adjustments to bring you closer to your goal. Life serves adversity as a barrier to entry in the pursuit of happiness.. Look within as you work to create value for people by first becoming of value to yourself.. Enjoy the fruits of your labor while you are engaged in their pursuit. Failing more is trying more. The greatest point of growth occurs right below your limit.

Be one of those people that works right up to their edge of comfort. We all start at a place where we need to improve if we are going to succeed on a more significant scale. When you seek out uncertainty, you are opening your mind to possibility. Procrastination, lack of prioritization, and the absence of goals all have their origins in fear.

In order to get what you want, you have to do those things that give you the confidence to do just a little bit more the next day. In December , John F. Jefferson dined here alone. A year before his death, he was asked by a father to give some counsel to his young son, Thomas Jefferson Smith.

He responded with a letter that began: Monticello Feb. Th: Jefferson to Th: Jefferson Smith. The letter concluded with ten rules to live by Jefferson titled A Decalogue of Canons for observation in practical life : Never put off till tomorrow what you can do to-day. Never trouble another for what you can do yourself. Never spend your money before you have it. Never buy a what you do not want, because it is cheap; it will be dear to you.

Pride costs us more than hunger, thirst and cold. We never repent of having eaten too little. Nothing is troublesome that we do willingly. How much pain have cost us the evils which have never happened! Take things always by their smooth handle. When angry, count ten, before you speak; if very angry, an hundred. The complete letter can be found on the National Archives website.

Leadership and life are built on relationships. Despite any talent or education you may have, your ability to work with and influence others is what will set you apart. Your Purpose Why am I here? You are not a victim. A specific purpose helps you also to align your actions to the purpose of others and your organization. It is nearly impossible to make good life choices with no self-awareness. A good place to get self-awareness is to watch the behavior of others. Often the behaviors that irritate you are mirrors of your own life. Social-Awareness How do you impact others?

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Before you interact with others, begin by asking what is the desired result based on who I am, my purpose, and who I want to be? We have an impact on everyone we meet. How do others perceive us? Is that our intent? Does it align with our purpose? The other part of the Conscious Success Model is how we differentiate ourselves. We have to be more proactive, more deliberate and consciously aware.

This is conscious success. How am I presenting myself to others? Am I having the impact I really want to make? This, of course, speaks to having a healthy self-awareness. Each of these differentiators as negative and a positive side. Either side will get you noticed. Avoid the side that will get you noticed for the wrong reasons. We mostly lack authenticity because we are trying to be what people want us to be in order to be accepted or popular. We are inauthentic to cover up for our insecurities. Authenticity leads to trust. Consistency matters. It might seem unrealistic to do this but deciding to be percent responsible forces you to move forward.

Blaming and justifying limits options and percent to zero percent responsibility expands options. Ask questions with the intent of clarifying your understanding. Differentiator 4: Articulate for Impact Closely related to differentiator 3 on listening is articulation. Have a good vocabulary. Before you speak, consider your emotional state. Also, think about what your purpose is and what you are trying to convey.

You can have a sense of humor, but it must be consistent with your image and what it is you want to accomplish. Gratitude is a choice we make each and every day. Having an attitude of gratitude gives you a positive outlook which makes you more attractive to others.

It takes commitment, focus, and a force of will. The Conscious Success Model provides a useful framework for not only differentiating yourself but creating a life that matters. The 9 Dimensions of Conscious Success is a great tool to put into the hands of anyone starting out in life. The first law is often referred to as the Law of Inertia. The law states that every object will remain at rest or continue in a straight line unless compelled to change its state by the action of an external force. In other words, things stay the way they are unless something comes along to disrupt them.

This law has the power to make us or break us. And it is at work in our lives all day, every day whether we are conscious of it or not. When we kick a soccer ball, it heads in a specific direction until it is acted upon by a force greater than the force that is currently propelling it downfield. Like that soccer ball, our life is moving along a path that is taking us to a particular future intentionally or not. And we will continue along that path to its destination until we do something different.

Our intentions mean nothing. In other words, our will be just like our unless we exert a force to change our direction that is greater than comfort we enjoy by continuing to do what we have always done producing the same results again and again. No force, no change.

Get on a new path. New actions will produce different results. For every cause, there is an effect. Today is connected to tomorrow. Every action we take and everything we say is taking us somewhere. We just need to be sure we are on the path that is taking us where we want to go; a path that is taking us to the person we want to become.

If we work harder than we did last year, then we will do better. If we sacrifice now, then we are investing in our future. If we reflect, then we will grow. If we improve our leadership, then people will follow us. If we are courageous, then we will inspire. If we are curious, then we will learn. If we avoid the trappings of power, then we will stay connected with those we serve. If we surround ourselves with the right people, then we will be enriched and will lift others up. If we are authentic and humble, then we will build trust. If we work this law to our advantage, then we will eradicate regret.

If we don't improve, then our circumstances won't improve either. Life naturally pushes us off-course and takes us on tangents. Anything meaningful in life is produced by moving upstream — against the current. We need to make some course corrections. We all do from time to time. Of course, this implies getting uncomfortable. As we look at our life, we all have directions that need to be changed.

It helps to begin this process by asking ourselves questions and giving serious and honest thought to the answers. What habits are holding me back? What three things do I want to accomplish by ? What does a good day look like? What routines keep me on track? Why do I do what I do? And most importantly, what am I grateful for? Then drill down into specific areas of your life: Do I make time to study and grow spiritually? What habits are draining my time and attention? What activities replenish me? Am I taking time to relax and grow in other areas of interest?

Am I sleep deprived? Am I eating healthy and avoiding processed foods? What do I need to change in my diet in ? Am I exercising regularly? Am I drinking enough water? Is my morning and evening routine setting me up for my best day? Am I living within my means? How much do I want to make in ? What do I have to do to reach that amount? What weaknesses do I need to minimize? Am I where I would like to be in my work or career? How can I increase the value I bring to work? What relationships are building me up? Are any relationships taking me off-track?

Who do I take for granted? Do I support those around me? Do I support and encourage others? Do I focus on building others up? Do I make time for others? Where do I need to grow? What strengths do I need to improve on? What do I need to learn? What books do I need to read? What seminars do I need to attend? What can I learn from the mistakes I made in ? The key to moving forward is the first step. Every destination needs to be broken down into incremental markers or indicators on the way to the destination. What is the first thing you need to do to get you moving in the right direction?

As you begin, focus on the actions required and not the end result. A small step is easier than a leap. Once the first step is made, it is easier to continue down the right path to your desired destination. Leading Matters: John L. Hennessy on the Leadership Journey A. Didn't See It Coming T. Asking for help makes most of us uncomfortable and we often go to great lengths to avoid doing it.

We fear rejection. We fear that people we think less of us. But the truth is we need the help and support of others to succeed. To be sure, leadership is fundamentally about asking people for help. Making matters worse, our intuitions about what should make others more likely to help are often dead wrong; our fumbling, apologetic ways of asking for assistance generally make people feel far less likely to want to help. We hate imposing on people and then inadvertently, we make them feel imposed upon. But for some reason we forget that when it is our turn to ask for help.

Research shows that people actually like us more when they have been able to help us. It makes them feel good too—unless they feel compelled to help. So what are the subtle cues that motivate people to work for us? Instead try these three ways of asking others for help: In-Group Reinforcement Those members of our group are the most likely to help us. The Positive Identity Reinforcement Most people like to think of themselves as helpful because it is part of what it means to be a good person.

We reinforce that with gratitude and appealing to the things that matter to them. They need not bother. If we feel we are not making an impact, we are likely to lose motivation. People need to clearly understand the impact of their helping. Research shows that when people are unable to get any kind of feedback about how well they are doing on a task, they quickly become disengaged from it. And be sure to follow-up. Let them know how things turned out.

It is practical advice for anyone asking for help in a way that will leave both parties feeling good about the relationship. Beyond the Drama Triangle Y. The GuruBook J. There's a Password for Every Door H. Unconditional Gratitude W. What Are Good People? Shake it Off I. The Mood Elevator W. Stretch: Unlock the Power of Less I. Ego Free Leadership E.

Conflict without Casualties C. Are You Living an Adult Story? Nothing facilitates community, collaboration, and innovation like humility. Humility is inclusive. It is inclusive of others ideas, others needs, others strengths, other contributions, and the realities that exist outside of our own head. A humble leader asks more questions and is open to more answers thus deepening the pool of resources they have to draw upon. But it requires a strength of character.

Humble leaders are strong enough to admit their mistakes and learn from them. Humble leaders are strong enough to celebrate their achievements of others. Humble leaders are strong enough to surround themselves with talented people without feeling threatened or diminished. Additionally, Humble people treat others as equals. Humble people are better team players. Humble people are willing to set aside their egos. Humility is the antidote to insecurity that often plagues us. A lack of humility actually drives insecurity.

Humility makes your strengths productive and multiplies the strengths of others. Humility acknowledges a world beyond our own thinking and minimizes our own limitations. A good leader knows this and acts accordingly to produce the best results. Do you have the strength to be humble? But how do we get outside our comfort zone? We avoid it altogether. Or we only do it half-heartedly.

All of these things sabotage our efforts. And the stories he includes from managers, executives, priests, baristas, stay-at-home-moms, singers, actors and performers, are helpful and relatable. And although these people are very different, there is a common theme. Customization—Designing a Personalized Baby-Step Plan This is the ability to tweak or adjust in often very slight ways how you perform a task to make it feel more comfortable and natural.

When facing difficult situations we often feel powerless, but we can alter situations to play to our strengths.

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For example, we can change the words we use or the topics we talk about, change our body language, or change the timing or location. Clarity—Getting Some Perspective on Your Fears Clarity is the ability to develop an even-handed, reasonable perspective on the challenges you face. It may not really be as far outside of our comfort zones as we imagine. Here are Five Comfort Zone Myths to consider: Myth 1: All it takes to step outside your comfort zone is taking a leap.

Reality: Nearly everyone struggles with situations outside their comfort zones. Myth 5: With enough inspiration, anyone can stretch outside their comfort zone. Reality: Anyone can do it, but it takes more than inspiration; it takes effort, persistence, strategy, and a keen understanding of the challenges. As a result, so many aspects of our societies, workplaces, and geopolitics are being reshaped and need to be remained. And he was better for it. You need a plan to succeed. You have to know more, you have to update what you know more often, and you have to do more creative things with it.

Self-motivation is now so much more important. The more technological we get, the more we need people who have a much broader framework. Quoting Dov Seidman: Technology creates possibilities for new behaviors and experiences and connection, but it takes human beings to make the behaviors principled, the experiences meaningful and the connections deeper and rooted in shared values and aspirations. Mastering Civility Civility costs nothing, and buys everything. Life is not scripted but we live it as though it were. In doing so, we create boxes that we operate within without ever really seeing the possibilities.

And the problem is we think that is reality. We are sabotaging ourselves. We act more like Coleridge and less like Keats. In I Am Keats , Asacker develops a metaphor for two worldviews as expressed through the poetry of two 19th century poets: Coleridge and Keats. Keats was passionate. He was moved by his senses and imagination. Capable of being in uncertainties, mysteries and doubts, he was uninhibited, open, and without judgment. Coleridge wants to predict an unknowable future. He is logic, order, control and progress.

Coleridge wants you to live a productive and mistake-free life. We never see the possibilities. Knowing is safe. And then, heaven forbid, we may have to change. Your old eyes adjust to a new world, and you become more creative and discerning.

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It is a philosophy says Asacker. Heart, then head. More at: IAmKeats. Surveys show that while some 40 percent of us make them, only 8 percent of us keep them. We may feel exhilarated when we set a big goal, but that soon gives way to anxiety. There is a way to set goals and achieve them. He did it by getting his pitchers to scale back their goals from lofty to bite-sized, from outcome to process. Instead, Rick refocused his pitchers on short-term, bite-sized process goals. He has to concentrate on hitting that glove. Hitting the glove on a high percentage of pitches is also the most probable path to achieving larger, outcome-oriented individual and team goals.

How It Translates We can all learn to refocus on hitting that glove. Whatever numbers they produced last year, they no longer matter. Time to prove yourself all over again. Many sales organizations try to motivate their sales forces with talk of raising the bar and hitting even bigger numbers. But that lofty-goal approach can trigger fear and worry instead. Just like pitchers, salespeople know there are parts of the sales game beyond our control.

By focusing on having daily, high-quality interactions with customers, I would make great progress toward putting a dent in my quota. Thinking about how many high-quality interactions I should have each day, I set the initial target at two. Before you laugh and ask what I was going to do after lunch, consider the math. Two high-quality interactions per day are 10 per week, and 40 per month.

As soon as I started focusing on my new simple, short-term, bite-sized process goal — two high-quality interactions with customers each day — I began thinking about my day differently. I began prioritizing those two high-quality interactions with customers above everything else. I wasted less time. Focusing on that one small change brought about big results. Gratitude encourages, clarifies, motivates, includes, and unifies. But gratitude is good for you too. Gratitude puts you in the right mindset to lead. Gratitude and humility are interconnected.

They reinforce each other. We alone are not responsible for who we are and what we do and that is the essence of leadership. We are never truly self-sufficient. In a practical way, gratitude provides guardrails in our life. Gratitude helps us to protect from ourselves. It is amazing how much gratitude plays into avoiding poor behavior and wrong thinking. Gratitude sets a boundary on our thoughts by making us mindful of others. It helps us to avoid going where we should not go because we are more self-aware. Gratitude requires that we slow down and reflect.

Gratitude is the basis of emotional intelligence. It puts other people first. It says you know and you care. While empathy has been found to be essential to leadership, empathy is not empathy if it is silent. It must be expressed. Gratefulness helps to curb unproductive emotions such as frustration, resentment, and revenge. Studies have shown that it is an antidote to depression. It has the power to heal and move us forward. It improves relationships and is a remedy to envy and greed.

Instead of trying to strive with others we are thankful for what they do. Grateful people find more meaning in life and feel more connected to others. In these changing and uncertain times, gratitude is a leaders ally. Life is a continuum. Gratitude allows a leader to appreciate where they are and the resources they have at their disposal to face what life throws at them. A habit of gratitude gives us perspective. More than a behavior it must come from the heart. It must be the mindset we lead from, manage from, and make decisions from. Gratefulness is grounded in reality because ultimately we must realize that everything good in our life is a gift.

Leadership begins and ends with gratefulness. The ability to produce at an elite level , in terms of both quality and speed. To produce tangible results that people value. Cal Newport bases his book Deep Work on the Deep Work Hypothesis : The ability to perform deep work is becoming increasingly rare at exactly the same time it is becoming increasingly valuable in our economy.

As a consequence, the few who cultivate this skill, and then make it the core of their working life, will thrive. Learning is an act of deep work. An act of intense focus. We are what we focus on and that is increasingly, the superficial. Shallow work adds to our sense of meaninglessness. There is the Monastic approach that eliminates or radically minimizes shallow obligations.

The Bimodal approach that suggests binging on deep work for various lengths of time. The Rhythmic approach makes deep work a habit by scheduling a regular chain of deep work in your day. The last approach and the one Newport prefers, is called the Journalistic approach.

Using this approach you fit deep work wherever you can into your schedule. This last approach however, requires a great deal of willpower and practice. The Rhythmic approach may work best to get you started. Take Breaks from Focus Make deep work a priority by taking breaks from focus, not from distraction. Be Intentional with Your Time Have a plan for your day. If you start your day with blocks of deep work scheduled in, you stand a much better chance of actually getting some deep work done. A deep life is a good life.

But a growing feeling of disappointment overwhelmed him. Rush from one meeting to the next, have too many emails to answer on any given day. There are moments when it seems all we do is fly by the seat of our pants. Yes, every aspect of our work rhythms conspires to throw us off-center!

Saint Augustine

Staying grounded feels like the impossible dream. I used to train actors. Actors study the art of being in the optimal state of mind. Well, you are the actor in your own life, and your life will unfold with more grace the moment you master some of the same skills. We tend to call them anchoring techniques.

Here are a few of my favorites. Beware — what works well for one person will not work as well for another. Self-Talk: Affirmations have become the stuff of satire. Too bad. To the cynic, an affirmation may seem too good to be true. Truth is, when you find an affirmation that works for you, the result DOES feel too good to be true!

When I feel tired and showing up tired is not an option : I am a vibrant vehicle of light and love. The three keywords — vibrant, light, love — are high energy words for me. They resonate deeply. It shifts my energy, every time. I repeat it to myself, quietly, for about 30 seconds. Combined with a few deep breaths, it activates the cellular energy within me and around me that I am seeking to access. Do not use MY affirmation. Find the words that affirm YOUR highest good within you.

Repeat them quietly. Instantly anchored! Sensory Reprogramming: Mental worry tends to get us unhinged, and classic anchoring techniques shift us away from the mind, back into our optimal states of being. Visualize the sensory details of this place. Calm will return quickly. An anchoring technique, applied with quiet commitment, invokes a powerful inner shift within 30 seconds. Make them a daily habit. And reap your anchoring rewards. Our environment triggers behaviors or responses in us.

When to Cooperate and When to Compete. What Are Your Hidden Strengths? Your strengths will get you in the door, but to make progress you are going to have to become more of who you are and draw on your hidden strengths.

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Hidden strengths are not weaknesses. They are capacities you have that have yet to be recognized, developed and utilized. They become your Learned Strengths. Your strengths and weaknesses need to be managed.


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Strengths need to be managed so that they are not overused or overbearing. Often they can be delegated. But the area between the two—your hidden strengths—not only provide a deep pool of strengths to draw on but they will help you to smooth out your rough edges and bring into balance your natural strengths. Is it Time to Disrupt You? Disruption can be a powerful and positive force. If we are to work with and take advantage of the disruptions in the world around us, we must be willing to disrupt ourselves. Return on Character We live in an age where wisdom is only wisdom if it is supported by numbers.

There are two obvious problems with this. First, we miss a lot because we are looking for immediate return. And so it puts our focus on the wrong things. And secondly, as a result, we tend to assign value to things in terms of numbers. It is assumed that if it gives us the best numbers, it must be the best choice or behavior.

Nevertheless, it is satisfying when the numbers do add up. The 5 Choices to Extraordinary Productivity The 5 Choices is a nuts and bolts solution to greater productivity. To improve the situation we have five choices to make in three areas : Decision Management, Attention Management, and Energy Management. This is really the foundational choice to make.

Too often we get caught up in Quadrant 4 spending time or too much time on the trivial things that contribute nothing to our life. Q1: The Quadrant of Necessity. Q3: The Quadrant of Distraction. They are confusing motion with progress, action with accomplishment. These are activities that are neither urgent nor important.

When we get burned out we often go here for escape. If we stay too long, we can experience depression and even despair. These are that activities that will make a real difference in terms of accomplishment and results like proactive work, achieving high-impact goals, creative thinking, planning, prevention, relationship building, learning, and renewal. But you have to make a conscious choice to operate in this quadrant. Identify your roles. Organize accordingly. The five energy drivers are adequate movement, proper diet, sleep, relaxation, and positive social connections.

Your brain is your number-one asset in a knowledge-work world. Fuel it properly. Are You Uncomfortable? The Ten Golden Rules of Leadership. Do You Have Moxie? They are tough on the outside but soft on the inside. When knocked down they know how to get back up and they can bring others with them because they are likeable. They have a passion for what they do and have a need to make a positive difference in the lives of others. They have ambition and want others to share in it. They know how to pick themselves up after a fall.

Street Smarts. They know how the world works and what makes people tick. Baldoni breaks moxie down into five characteristics that you can practice and develop to be a leader that demonstrates moxie. Each characteristic is brought to life through the examples of leaders who have demonstrated it in their own life and leadership. The first is Mindfulness. Second is Opportunity. She is motivated by a desire to make a positive difference. Third is X-Factor. She has the persevering spirit that radiates resolve. Leaders with the X-Factor are humble, and their humility attracts others to them.

These can all be examined and improved. In addition, look for opportunities to improve through more training and consider taking on responsibilities that stretch you. Fourth is Innovation. Sometimes you need to take risks. That means thinking differently, doing differently, and rewarding others who do the same. They are tuned to the future. That gives rise to innovation. They are focused on making a positive difference in their teams and in their organizations.

Preparing and developing yourself now sets you up to make better decisions when you do get knocked down. Moxie is full of great stories and examples making it immediately relatable and practical. It is structured so that you can thoughtfully and tactically look at each of these areas to see where you can better prepare yourself. Baldoni also provides an appendix that works as a handbook to guide you in this. Questions, examples, additional thoughts and action steps help you access where you are at and what you might need to do next.

Moxie is not just about your work life, it also impacts every other aspect of your life and positively influences the lives of those you touch. Leadership Impact: Where it Comes From Why do some leaders make an impact, while others flounder after initial success? As Christians, we can not have a business that is just focused on enriching ourselves.

We must serve the community, our customers and our employees. As small business owners we lift up communities.


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  • Recent Episodes.
  • Religion and Morality.

Consider partnering with a charity, adopt a school, give your employees time to do volunteer service. Remember, no matter what we give we will never beat God giving. God wants us to be known by how we love. The Lord filled the would with Peace, Joy and Love. Realize that as you start small and stay consistent you can build a sustainable small business. In business, stress is part of the deal. But we need to always remember God is really in control. Your leadership and faith are required to rise above any tough situation that comes your way.

Your business will grow into a large, flourishing plant if it is nurtured with your leadership the right way. Pray your way through any challenges you face in your business. Take your burdens to the Lord and leave them there. Your faith is required to get your prayers answered. The one things you need to be on guard about is negative self talk. When you make a mistake learn to forgive yourself quickly.

Dwelling on negative words from customers or employees will just hold you back. Treat each day as a new start. Love yourself and be loving to others. I know that my daily devotional book Jesus Calling by Sarah Young helps me stay focused. Your faith is required in order for your business to flourish and your prayers to be answered.

It includes the 12 Ps of Running a Successful Business and readers will finish the book with a new strategic plan to take their business to the next level. Melinda F. Emerson, known to many as SmallBizLady is one of America's leading small business experts. As a seasoned entrepreneur, professional speaker, and small business coach, she develops audio, video and written content to fulfill her mission to end small business failure. As CEO of Quintessence Multimedia, Melinda educates entrepreneurs and Fortune companies on subjects including small business start-up, business development and social media marketing.

Forbes Magazine named her 1 woman for entrepreneurs to follow on Twitter. Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Feel free to share



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